How do I send or exchange an asset that runs on another network?

Many of the tokens in Exodus run on another network, and so they require a secondary asset to pay for transaction fees, or gas.

  • ERC20 tokens like Aragon (ANT), Golem (GNT), Civic (CVC), 0x (ZRX), etc., run on the Ethereum blockchain, and so they require Ethereum (ETH) to pay for gas.
  • BEP20 tokens like BNB (BSC BNB), PancakeSwap (CAKE), USD Coin (USDC), and Shiba Inu (SHIB) run on the BNB Smart Chain, and so they require BNB Smart Chain BNB to pay for gas.
  • MATIC tokens run on the Polygon network, and so they require Polygon (MATIC) to pay for gas.
  • SPL tokens run on the Solana network, and so they require Solana (SOL) to pay for gas.
  • CW20 tokens run on the Terra network, and so they require Terra (LUNA) to pay for gas.

In this article:


Desktop tutorial video: How can I tell which network my token uses?


Mobile tutorial video: How can I tell which network my token uses?


How can I tell which network my token uses?

Several assets can run on multiple networks. However, Exodus might not support each token on every network. As such, it is important to know which network your asset runs on so that you can choose the correct network to receive it in Exodus. To make it easier, you can look at the network badge in your asset's wallet.

Please note: If an asset doesn't have a network badge, it runs on its own network. You can choose the correct network by selecting the cryptocurrency's name (e.g. Cosmos) or ticker (e.g. ATOM).

Below are examples of network badges on Desktop, Mobile and Browser Extension.

Desktop

In the desktop wallet, the network will show as a badge below and on the top right of the asset's logo.

The easiest way to confirm the network your token uses is by searching for it in your Exodus wallet.

Mobile

In the mobile wallet, the network will show as a badge above and on the top right of the asset's logo.

The easiest way to confirm the network your token uses is by searching for it in your Exodus wallet.

Browser Extension

In the Exodus Browser Extension, you can see what network an asset uses by looking at the network logo next to each asset in the wallet section. 

Currently, the browser extension only supports tokens on the Solana network. To add custom Solana tokens please see our guide here: How do I add a custom token?


Why do I pay for my token's transactions with another asset?

Some tokens in your Exodus wallet require another asset to pay for transaction fees. This is often known as gas.

This is because these tokens are created and hosted on another network (or blockchain).

You can think of the network as the road and the tokens as cars on the road.

Using Ethereum as an example, the Ethereum network is the road, ERC20 tokens are the cars, and Ethereum (ETH) is both a car and the only type of gas all the other cars run on.

Here are the other examples:

  • BEP20 tokens run on the BNB Smart Chain, so BNB Smart Chain BNB (BSC BNB) is the only type of gas BEP20 tokens can use to pay for transactions.
  • MATIC tokens run on the Polygon network, so Polygon (MATIC) is the only type of gas Matic tokens can use to pay for transactions.
  • SPL tokens run on the Solana network, so Solana (SOL) is the only type of gas SPL tokens can use to pay for transactions. You can read more about this here: Do I need Solana to send my SPL tokens from Exodus?
  • Tron tokens run on the Tron network, so TRX is the only type of gas Tron tokens can use to pay for transactions. You can find out more here: TRON and TRON token FAQs - Learn more about TRX, TRC10, and TRC20 tokens
  • CW20 tokens run on the Terra network, so Terra (LUNA) is the only type of gas CW20 tokens can use to pay for transactions.

How do I pay for ERC20 token transactions with Ethereum?

All ERC20 transactions require Ethereum (ETH) to power transactions on the Ethereum network, known as gas. To send or exchange an ERC20 token, or use an ERC20 token such as DAI in Compound Finance, you need a minimum amount of ETH in your Exodus wallet. This is to cover Ethereum network transaction fees.

For example, instead of paying Bitcoin (BTC) for transaction fees in BTC transactions, you pay small amounts of Ethereum for transaction fees for Ethereum or ERC20 transactions.

If you don’t have the minimum amount of ETH for ERC20 token transactions, you will encounter an error message that you need more ETH in your wallet. 

Mobile:

Desktop:

You can acquire ETH by using our in-app exchange feature to exchange from any (non-Ethereum based) assets in your wallet for ETH, or by receiving ETH from another wallet.

Since Ethereum-based assets run on Ethereum’s blockchain, transaction fees are paid in ETH and not in the assets themselves. This applies to all ERC20 tokens (e.g. Tether USD (USDT), Shiba Inu (SHIB), etc.).

In the screenshot above, we’re trying to send some DAI. You can see that the Network Fee is paid for in ETH.

Please note: It is possible to enable custom fees for ERC20 tokens.

During periods of high congestion, network fees increase as miners prioritize the more expensive transactions first.

You can see your ERC20 transactions on a block explorer like Etherscan.


How do I pay for BEP20 token transactions with BSC BNB?

As with ERC20 token transactions using ETH, all BEP20 transactions require BNB Smart Chain BNB (BSC BNB) to power them on the BNB Smart Chain network. To send or exchange a BEP20 token such as CAKE, you need a minimum amount of BSC BNB in your Exodus wallet. This is to cover BNB Smart Chain network transaction fees.

If you don’t have the minimum amount of BSC BNB for BEP20 token transactions, you will encounter an error message that you need more BSC BNB in your wallet. 

Mobile:

Desktop:

You can acquire BNB Smart Chain BNB by using our in-app exchange feature to exchange from any (non-BEP20) assets in your wallet for BSC BNB, or by receiving BSC BNB from another wallet.

Since BSC-based assets run on the BNB Smart Chain blockchain, transaction fees are paid in BSC BNB and not in the assets themselves. This applies to all BEP20 tokens such as PancakeSwap (CAKE).

In the screenshot above, we’re trying to send some CAKE. You can see that the Network Fee is paid for in BSC BNB.

You can see your BEP20 transactions on a block explorer like BscScan.


How do I pay for MATIC token transactions with MATIC?

All MATIC token transactions require Polygon (MATIC) to power them on the Polygon network. To send or exchange a MATIC token, you need a minimum amount of MATIC in your Exodus wallet. This is to cover Polygon network transaction fees.

If you don’t have the minimum amount of MATIC for MATIC token transactions, you will encounter an error message that you need more MATIC in your wallet.  

Mobile:

Desktop:

You can acquire MATIC by using our in-app exchange feature to exchange from any assets in your wallet for MATIC, or by receiving MATIC from another wallet.

Since MATIC-based assets run on the Polygon network, transaction fees are paid in MATIC and not in the assets themselves. This applies to all MATIC tokens.

In the screenshot above, we’re trying to send some MATIC USDC. You can see that the Network Fee is paid for in MATIC.

You can see your MATIC token transactions on a block explorer like polygonscan.


How do I pay for SPL token transactions with SOL?

All SPL token transactions require Solana (SOL) to power them on the Solana network. To send or exchange an SPL token, you need a minimum amount of SOL in your Exodus wallet. This is to cover Solana network transaction fees.

If you don’t have the minimum amount of SOL for SPL token transactions, you will encounter an error message that you need more SPL in your wallet.

Mobile:

Desktop:

You can acquire Solana (SOL) by using our in-app exchange feature to exchange from any (non-SPL) assets in your wallet for SOL, or by receiving SOL from another wallet.

Since SOL-based assets run on the Solana blockchain, transaction fees are paid in SOL and not in the assets themselves. This applies to all SPL tokens such as Serum (SRM) and Raydium (RAY).

In the screenshot above, we’re trying to send some SRM. You can see that the Network Fee is paid for in SOL.

You can see your SPL transactions on a block explorer like Solana Explorer.


How do I pay for CW20 token transactions with LUNA?

All CW20 token transactions require Terra (LUNA) to power them on the Terra network. To send or exchange a CW20 token, you need a minimum amount of LUNA in your Exodus wallet. This is to cover Terra network transaction fees.

If you don’t have the minimum amount of LUNA for CW20 token transactions, you will encounter an error message that you need more LUNA in your wallet.

Mobile:

Desktop:

You can acquire Terra (LUNA) by using our in-app exchange feature to exchange from any (non-CW20) assets in your wallet for LUNA, or by receiving LUNA from another wallet.

Since CW20-based assets run on the Terra blockchain, transaction fees are paid in LUNA and not in the assets themselves. This applies to all CW20 tokens such as TerraUSD (UST) and Anchor Protocol (ANC).

In the screenshot above, we’re trying to send some UST. You can see that the Network Fee is paid for in LUNA.

You can see your LUNA and CW20 transactions on a block explorer like ETfinder.


How do I send a token that runs on another network?

The process for sending an asset on another network is the same as sending other blockchain assets:

1
Click on the asset's  Wallet.
2
Choose the asset you want to send.
3
Click the Send button.
4
Enter the amount in the asset or in your local currency, such as USD, EUR, etc.
5
Enter the amount you would like to send and click the Send button.

Please note: You will need some ETH to pay for the network fee to send an ERC20 token, BSC BNB to pay for the network fee to send a BEP20 token, MATIC to pay for the network fee to send a MATIC token, and SOL to pay for the network fee to send an SPL token.

6
Exodus will show you a confirmation screen with the amount, value in your local currency, and address. Once you’ve confirmed all the details, hit Send!

A note for advanced Ethereum users:

Fees for sending Ethereum or Ethereum assets increase if you send them to a smart contract address.

The fees are higher to give the smart contract enough gas to process the transaction and execute the contract’s programming. Sending a transaction with a low fee to a smart contract could cause a failed transaction, so Exodus automatically adjusts the fee for you when sending assets to a smart contract.


How do I exchange a token that runs on another network?

The process for exchanging these assets for other crypto is the same as the standard in-app Exodus exchange process:

1
Click Exchange.
2
Select the assets that you want to exchange in our third-party exchange API provider. You can select the assets using the dropdown menus or by searching for the asset names.

Please note: You will need some ETH to pay for the network fee to send an ERC20 token, BSC BNB to pay for the network fee to send a BEP20 token, MATIC to pay for the network fee to send a MATIC token, and SOL to pay for the network fee to send an SPL token.

3
Enter the amount you wish to exchange by clicking ALL, HALF, or MIN. Alternatively, you can enter the amounts in the assets themselves or in your local currency.
4
Click Exchange! Note that you have a 3-second window to cancel the exchange before the funds leave your wallet.
5
Once you’ve clicked Exchange, you’re good to go! You will receive the asset you exchanged from our third-party exchange API provider soon.

Also, you may have noticed when receiving Ethereum-based assets that all your Ethereum-based assets have the same address. Not to worry! This address is your Ethereum address and used because, as mentioned, Ethereum-based assets use the Ethereum blockchain and not their own blockchain with unique addresses.


What happens if I send an unsupported token to Exodus?

Your Exodus wallet is capable of receiving any ERC20, BEP20, MATIC, or SPL tokens whether or not Exodus supports them. However, unsupported tokens will not be visible in Exodus. You can manage unsupported tokens by using your private keys.

Here is a guide on how to manage unsupported ERC20 tokens: How do I manage unsupported ERC20 tokens?